About

In a walkabout of downtown Fredericton, the Capital city of the Province of New Brunswick, you will discover the historic landmark on the corner of Carleton and King Streets known as Wilmot United Church.

Wilmot United Church is the last of the large frame churches that dominated the city skyline throughout the 19th century. The church building is included as one of Canada's Historic Places: A Federal, Provincial and Territorial Collaboration. To discover our place in this listing, use this direct link:
http://www.historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=6229

The present Wilmot United Church is a congregation of The United Church of Canada. It was constructed as a Methodist Church in 1852, following the fire of 1850 which destroyed the previous building on this site, along with many other buildings between Carleton Street and the Provincial Legislature building which is located several blocks to the east.

The History page of FrederictonFirefighters.ca records the following information:

"The Great Fire of 1850 - 2000 people left homeless, over 300 buildings burned, including 156 homes, 18 acres and four city blocks were destroyed. The total loss from this fire was estimated at a staggering 100,000 pounds."

(For more about the fire of 1850 and specifically the plight of the families and congregation of the Fredericton Methodist Church, as it was then known, and the construction of the church that now stands on the corner of King and Carleton Streets, see http://johnwood1946.wordpress.com/2011/12/15/the-great-fire-in-fredericton-1850-early-accounts/)

Within the pages of this web site you will discover much more information about this traditional church building and congregation that finds its home in downtown Fredericton in the midst of daily commerce and business. You will also discover some information about the congregation as it exists today, as well as some important aspects of our beliefs.

"The Story of Wilmot United Church 1791 - 2002 Fredericton, New Brunswick" by Anita J. Jones was published by the church in 2002. It is the latest in a series of historic sketches of the church's life, work and witness.

 

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